*Facepalm*

Have you ever felt super organised when working on a project? You have total control over all the files, the music and graphic elements. “Everything is fine”! Yeah, I thought so too, then I opened one of my projects from 6 months ago, and I wanted to punch myself.

I work for a cycling company, and recently I have been needing to go through some of my old projects to find and re-export a couple of the first videos I made for them. I thought my adventure into my old project files would be a quick walk in the park, but it turned out to be an expedition into the depts of the Amazon jungle.

It’s weird how you can live in chaos and think that everything is fine. If I remember correctly, I didn’t think I was that unorganised when I first started working on those projects. Now on the other hand, it feels like I’m a stranger visiting someones messy home (we’ve all been there), and thinking: how did I even put up with this?

What’s funny is that I’ve always considered myself as a fairly organised, but maybe I am more of a creative minded person than I thought I was. At least I have learnt something from this. And it made me re-think how I label and organise my projects, so that in the future I’ll be wanting to give myself a hug instead of a punch. Also, not only is being organised important for your own benefit, but especially when working with other people. If you bring your mess into a project, people are going to pull their hair out because of you.

Here is a couple of the things I do:
1. Label exports with date, time and proper description.
I learnt this from my friend when we were working on an ad that we exported countless version for people to look at and give their input. It usually looks like this: year/month/date/time/name. (Example: 2015-04-28-1000-BlogPost. Important! Remember to use a 24 hour clock.)¬†This way, the newest version is always on the bottom of the list in my folder and it’s easy to share with other people.

2. Folders, folders, folders
Inside my projects, I’ve been starting to make way more folders. And folders inside those folders. Obviously they have to be labelled properly, but at least I don’t have to look through a list of endless files.

Do you have any horror-stories like this? Or are you the organised type person who has everything under control? I would love to hear some stories, and even some tips on how you organise your files, because believe me, I need to learn it!

– Morten

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Go! Go! Go!

A couple of weeks ago, my “Location Camera” class teacher walked in and gave us the task for the day: Make a 2 minute skit that is awkward and takes place in a car. Deadline: 3 hours. Let’s go!

Now, this has happened before. We got a small list of guidelines for the skit and off we went. Last time, I was prepared. I already had a script that I wanted to film, so it was easy. This time though, I was not prepared at all. And, as mentioned in my last post, my brain went “Nothing Found”.¬†Luckily, my friends and I got an idea after 45 minutes of brainstorming, and we pulled it through. (I’ll see if I can get a link to it sometime soon.)

In spite of the stressfulness of these turnarounds, I actually really enjoy them. The reason is that we get challenged to just make something. ANYTHING! Just get the task done. Most of the time, what we produce isn’t going to be the next big YouTube hit or make it to a short film festival. It does however, challenge us to take what we already have learned, our skills and ideas, pull it together and produce something that we all can enjoy and have a laugh at.

The second reason that I like these kind of projects is that they require that I work with my class mates as a team. I quickly realise that I can not create the idea, film, act and edit all by myself. In the end, if I ever am going to create a feature film or do any massive projects, I need more people around me that can help out. It’s not about me at all, it’s about telling the story together.

– Morten