Waiting for ‘the Golden Snitch (Pt. 1/2)

End scene. The credits are rolling up the 27″ iMac, 2 meters away from me. The sound of eastern european music is playing in the background.

“Did you like it?” my girlfriend asks me with anticipation in her voice.

“Yeah, it was good!” I answer.

The eastern european music continues, and we start laughing at a tiny animated cartoon, dancing what looks like a Russian traditional folk dance.

It’s times like this, when I’ve finished watching a movie I really enjoy, that is not only a good story that has kept me interested the whole way through, but also done excellently in terms of costume, style, colours, framing etc, that I start dreaming again about finally making a narrative film myself.

But then, the excuses come.

“I don’t have a script yet”.
” I can’t think of anyone to act for me”
“When will I get time for this?”
“Would other people want to help me?
“I don’t have enough gear”

The list goes on and on.

I think one of my biggest problems when dreaming about making something new, is that I’m waiting for everything to be perfect. I am waiting for the right opportunity to make the film that I’ve been dreaming about making for so long. So I sit. And watch. And I look for ‘the Golden Snitch’. It’s out there somewhere. I know it. And when I get it, it’ll win me the game. So I leave it with dreaming, and waiting. Maybe I’ll start writing a new script, and then put it on the shelf after 2-3 pages. And then I wait again.

How long am I willing to wait? Don’t know. But maybe I should just start playing the game instead. Get in the game with the other players. Fight for goals and have a good time. And then, maybe one day, the snitch will show up. But who knows?

What’s the story?

Three words that I saw on the back of a bus while driving yesterday. I think it was an ad for a radio station or something, but it got me thinking.

These three words are super important, and something I should keep asking myself all the time when working on a project. Does my choices serve the story? It can be framing, camera movement, colour, music, a cut in the edit. All of this plays a part of highlighting the most important aspect of my film: the story.

That’s all I had to say for today. What are some choices you have made to tell or highlight the story when working on a project? Would love to hear some examples in the comments.

– Morten

Go! Go! Go!

A couple of weeks ago, my “Location Camera” class teacher walked in and gave us the task for the day: Make a 2 minute skit that is awkward and takes place in a car. Deadline: 3 hours. Let’s go!

Now, this has happened before. We got a small list of guidelines for the skit and off we went. Last time, I was prepared. I already had a script that I wanted to film, so it was easy. This time though, I was not prepared at all. And, as mentioned in my last post, my brain went “Nothing Found”. Luckily, my friends and I got an idea after 45 minutes of brainstorming, and we pulled it through. (I’ll see if I can get a link to it sometime soon.)

In spite of the stressfulness of these turnarounds, I actually really enjoy them. The reason is that we get challenged to just make something. ANYTHING! Just get the task done. Most of the time, what we produce isn’t going to be the next big YouTube hit or make it to a short film festival. It does however, challenge us to take what we already have learned, our skills and ideas, pull it together and produce something that we all can enjoy and have a laugh at.

The second reason that I like these kind of projects is that they require that I work with my class mates as a team. I quickly realise that I can not create the idea, film, act and edit all by myself. In the end, if I ever am going to create a feature film or do any massive projects, I need more people around me that can help out. It’s not about me at all, it’s about telling the story together.

– Morten

“Nothing Found”

That’s what welcomed me when I first opened this blog. The reason? I hadn’t posted anything yet. (Obvious, I know..)

This happens to me a lot, especially when I am trying to find ideas for a new story or just being creative in general. My brain tells me: “Nothing Found”. So I sit there. Trying to dig through all distractions and working with every single hint of an idea that I can possibly think of. But again, I usually end up on “Nothing Found”.

What I realised was that the more I try to look for an idea, the harder it is. Usually, the best ideas that I’ve had has come when I really don’t think about it. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that I’m just going to walk around and do nothing, then one day something big is just going to hit, and that’s when I’m going to start writing. I believe I need to write and work on my creativity every day (That’s partially why I started this blog). My point is that when inspiration hits, I write it down. It can be as short as a small note on my phone, or I sit down and write the first pages of a script. That way, I’m not stressing out when it seems like my brain is going “Nothing Found”, but rather just relax and take a hold of inspiration when it strikes.

– Morten